This is a small excerpt from our chapter in the forthcoming book Neon Genesis Evangelion and Philosophy.

Among the most significant shows that Netflix has acquired, lies undoubtedly Neon Genesis Evangelion. What makes the show so interesting, is not (necessarily) its depiction of epic battles between giant aliens and robots, but rather its engagement with a number of deep psychological and philosophical issues.

At the center of the story is our main character, Shinji Ikari, a young boy who struggles with depression and anxiety. …


In a recent article, published in The American Journal of Bioethics by Robert Chapman and myself*, we argue that accurate representation of the entire autism spectrum requires putting the voices of non-verbal autistics center-stage. The article is titled ‘ Representing the Autism Spectrum,’ (hence the title of this post), and attempts to remedy the binary framing common within the autism cure-versus-acceptance literature.

Intended as a response to an article by McCoy et al. we criticize their set-up of autism as binary framing between what we call “self-representing autistics” and “nonrepresenting autistics” (p. 46). The former we consider to be “verbal…


A brief report on our recent publication.

A few days ago, I have published a paper with a number of other bioethicists spread across a number of institutions (Oxford, Yale, Sydney, among others). In it, we reply to a recent article by Mal and Navin in which they made an exceedingly strong claim that we could not agree with.

[W]e maintain that it is always unethical to adopt a policy that necessitates that children become worse off, in order that the vulnerable elderly become better off, even if doing so saves money or advances aggregate well-being. — (Malm and Navin 2020, 54)

Our response is titled “Are…


Interview by Lindsay Jordan and Richard Marshall

Chris Letheby is a philosopher working on issues related to the therapeutic and transformative potential of classic psychedelic drugs. His doctoral research, conducted at the University of Adelaide, presented the first systematic analysis of psychedelic experience within the framework of 21st century philosophy of cognitive science.

3:AM: What made you become a philosopher?

Chris Letherby: Existential questions. I was raised Christian, and rejected that in my early teens, but then in my late teens I spent a year or so as a hardcore fundamentalist Tibetan Buddhist. I swallowed whole a vast and complex…


Tim Lewens interviewed by Richard Marshall.

So does this mean that we still have something to learn from Popper, Kuhn and the other big beasts of mid-century philosophy of science? Yes! Feyerabend is right, I think, to cast doubt on the existence of any recipe that will tell scientists how to go about investigating the world: the interesting question for us is whether this really means that in science anything goes.

I’m especially doubtful of ‘memetics’-an approach that begins with the claim that natural selection requires the existence of replicators, and which moves on to allege the existence…


Hilde Lindemann interviewed by Richard Marshall.

Hilde Lindemann is a philosopher who bites! She is a key figure in the philosophy of bioethics, feminist bioethics, the ethics of familes, feminist ethics and the social construction of identities. She writes essential dangerous books such as Holding and Letting Go, Damaged Identities , Narrative Repair, and calls us all out to speak truth to power.

3:AM: You’re a leading professor of philosophy, working primarily on feminist bioethics. So were you always a philosophising type of person, brooding on the meaning of things and so forth, or has this career been something of…


William Lewis interviewed by Richard Marshall.

Just being a Marxist in academic philosophy is incredibly difficult, even in France. Althusser, though, was fortunate enough to be his most philosophically active during the two decades where being a Marxist philosopher was not only an institutional possibility but during revolutionary years where such work was of global interest. Althusser’s tide rose with the post-Stalinist communist left and it fell as this movement became fragmented and declined. …


Stephen Mumford interviewed by Richard Marshall.

Stephen Mumford is cool, calm and collected as he broods on the big issues in the metaphysics of science. He thinks Russell a pivotal figure in metaphysics and more significant in that area than Wittgenstein, thinks of Armstrong’s metaphysics as a beautiful whole, is a dispositionalist when thinking about the laws of nature, doesn’t want philosophy to go to war with physics, isn’t an X-phier, thinks powers are real in their own right, thinks intentionality has a naturalistic explanation in terms of the causal powers of agents and likes the idea that nature, including…


Guy Longworth interviewed by Richard Marshall.

‘Ordinary language philosophers think in that way because they think that competent speakers know what it would be correct or incorrect to say when, and perhaps know why it would be correct or incorrect.’ ‘Experimental philosophers are more generous-perhaps, more democratic-about whose views count and, second, that ordinary language philosophers are more generous about how those views count.’ ‘I think that common-sense is important in philosophy, at least insofar as our aims as philosophers are more than merely exploratory-that is, insofar as we hope to get things right. For common-sense is just our general…


Liam Murphy interviewed by Richard Marshall.

‘I would say that the most important issue raised by international law for the question of the grounds of law is that of whose beliefs and attitudes count for the fixing of the political/social grounds of law.’ ‘Positivism and nonpositivism differ on the role of moral considerations in determining the content of the law in force. All sensible views treat matters of brute social/political fact as partly determining law’s content but some, the nonpositivists, have it that moral judgment is inevitably required in interpreting legal materials to figure out what the law says.’ ‘I…

Walter Veit

Scientist, philosopher, and writer at the University of Sydney. Homepage: walterveit.com | You can follow me on https://www.facebook.com/WalterVeitOfficialPage

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